Latest news

ArcticZymes on Norwegian national TV

On Thursday 29 January, Norway’s most popular science TV show, “Schrödingers katt” on NRK, made a story on how enzymes from ArcticZymes can improve DNA analysis as part of the criminal investigation of rape cases.

Through interviews with Marthe Aune, bioengineer at the Center for Legal Genetics (Rettsgenetisk senter) in Tromsø, the story explains how enzymes from arctic shrimps can be used to remove the DNA in a DNA test from a rape victim, without damaging the sperm cell DNA from the rapist.

As the story points out, enzymes from ArcticZymes make such DNA analysis easier and more evident with regards to a reliable output. More evident DNA profiles will strengthen criminal investigations and evidences in rape cases.

As a student at the Arctic University of Norway, Marthe Aune has previously headed a research project in cooperation with ArcticZymes on arctic enzymes and DNA in legal genetic analysis.

Here you can watch the Schrödingers katt story on arctic enzymes and DNA analysis.

There are also two accompanying stories on local news sites, Nordlys and UiT.no.

Reducing DNA content during protein purification

We have just published our poster for “Reducing DNA content during protein purification with an easily removable nuclease” to the website. This poster was presented at PepTalk, January 19-23 2015 in San Diego, USA. Below you can read the introduction:

When purifying DNA-modifying enzymes, an essentially DNA-free product is desirable as endogenous DNA from production may contaminate down-stream applications.

While nuclease treatment of the crude cell-lysate is a common step during protein purification, its primary function is viscosity reduction for easier sample handling rather than complete DNA removal. More efficient enzymatic DNA removal could be achieved if applied to a partially purified protein sample, such as the His-trap eluate, where the majority of impurities have been removed and the volume is reduced; however the salt concentrations used in elution protocols are incompatible with the salinity optima of most commercially available nucleases. Furthermore, treatment of semi-pure protein may cause residual nuclease contamination in the purified protein which will interfere with
nucleic-acid based applications.

ArcticZymes has developed a Heat-Labile Salt Active Nuclease (HL-SAN) that is compatible with treatment of eluates: it is active at up to 1M NaCl, tolerates imidazole and can be separated from most proteins by cation exchange or inactivated by reducing agents. Here we present efficient DNA removal from recombinantly-produced T4 DNA ligase by direct treatment of the His-trap eluate with HL-SAN, and demonstrate that the final, active T4 ligase is free of contaminating HL-SAN activity.

You can view the poster here (PDF) or learn more about HL-SAN over here

ArcticZymes named “Biological Supplier of the Year” by Thermo Fisher Scientific

ArcticZymes, a subsidiary of Biotec Pharmacon, announced today that Thermo Fisher Scientific, world leader in serving Life Science, has awarded ArcticZymes with “Biological Supplier of the Year”.

ArcticZymes was acknowledged for their engagement in multiple sales through regional, national and international offices, Just-in-time inventory, rapid response to non-forecasted demand and a year-on-year downward cost to Thermo Fisher.

Supplier Day 2014

From left: Mark O’Donnell (VP Global Operations), Svein Lien (CEO, Biotec Pharmacon), Tom Fenwick (Strategic Sourcing Manager), Peter Granick (VP Global Sourcing Thermo Fisher Scientific), and Wayne Woodward (VP Global Supply Chain).

“ArcticZymes has worked with Thermo Fischer for years through several of their entities. This award is a great recognition of ArcticZymes’ outstanding services and ability to adopt into new and demanding customer expectations. With this award we believe we can expand our relation to this important customer even further”, stated Svein Lien, CEO of Biotec Pharmacon and ArcticZymes.

ArcticZymes’ enzymes are included in numerous PCR kits for use in molecular biology and molecular diagnostics. Use of ArcticZymes’ heat labile and cold adapted enzymes has allowed for simplified practices, and has moved boundaries within diagnostics.